I have a website—now what?

facebook twitter

When people see me walking down the street, they immediately rush over and ask: “Patty, what can I do to make my website better?”

First, I smile and tell them, “Get out of my dream, silly.” Then I wake up and see the cat from next door trying to open my window with his paw. Every. Single. Day.

Seriously though, as a member of the Harlequin.com team, I am surrounded by wise web wunderkinds (alliteration high five!) who always ask the question “how can we make our site better, more accessible, more user friendly?” Here are a few key principles we’ve been following for the last few years:

1. Offer your audience new content regularly. You don’t have to blog every day or tweet every hour. Work off a weekly or semi-monthly schedule, if you’d like, so your followers know you’re around and will keep you top of mind. There are some content management systems like WordPress or Tumblr that will allow you to schedule content in so you don’t have to worry about remembering to post once in a while. Placing your tweet stream on your home page is also a great way of bringing new content in.

2. Make sure your readers can subscribe to your updates with one click. Keep your newsletter subscription button on the home page and “above the fold”.  Make your Twitter/Facebook/Goodreads icons large enough to spot on the header or footer.  This way, your audience can connect with you without the hassle of rooting through your whole site to find that info.

3. Keep your page design fresh and up-to-date. Rule of thumb is usually a new look every two years and it doesn’t have to be the whole site. Consider updating your header graphic or your background image to start. Honestly, it doesn’t have to be expensive either. There are also low cost template options available if your site is running on WordPress or Joomla.

4. Speaking of design, keep your site uncluttered and be generous with your white space. The busy home page went away with the nineties. A simple design with a good text-to-background colour ratio for easy reading will engage your site visitors and keep them on your site longer!
(Note: Web usability experts are united in saying that white space improves comprehension, at least 20%!)

5. Are you using analytics? It’s a lot easier than you think, with services like Google Analytics (free!) and Woopra (free for non-commercial use). Find out how people are finding your site (i.e. search terms, or where they’re clicking through from) and what they gravitate toward. How do your readers/followers use your site? Do they read your updates or are they stuck on the home page? Are any of your promotions leading potential new readers to your site? These analytic tools not only help you understand your site visitors, they also provide handy charts and graphs to help plan your own brand/marketing efforts.

Whether you’re published or aspiring to be published, a solid web presence is always a good thing to have. Building a following—a community, if you will—takes time but at least you have a professional, up-to-date site to use as a launch pad for all things YOU!

Now it’s your turn: what’s the best website tip you’ve ever received?

———————

Patty Anasco (@pattyanasco) is Assistant Manager, Website Operations for Harlequin.com and is juggling simultaneous addictions to Candy Crush, the Lizzie Bennet Diaries and The Voice. An intervention is imminent.

Sealed with a kiss!

facebook twitter

The first volume of the Love Letter Anthologies released this week. Yay!

This project has been quite the undertaking – 4 authors, 6 volumes and 26 steamy stories. Uh huh. Yeah. We didn’t sleep, but had a blast creating them.

The conversations were epic. And, at times, mildly disturbing.

We shared a fictional (but frighteningly realistic) transcript of one of these conversations on the Harlequin blog yesterday. Here’s another glimpse into the inner workings of the Love Letters Team and what you might find in Love Letters Volume 1: Obeying Desire.

 photo CARINA_0413_9781426895357_zps5ccd5476.jpg

Maggie: So how was it we all wrote BDSM for the first Love Letters volume, anyway? In my case, I thought it would be cute for the daughter of the sex-shop owners to encounter her high school crush, only he’s a police officer in their town. Could have been pretty vanilla, but when he whipped out those handcuffs…

Emily: Characters will do that to you.

Christina: Handcuff you?

Emily (rolling her eyes): I meant, characters will surprise you like that.

Ginny: I don’t know about characters, but you three all surprised me when you sent in your stories.

Maggie: I guess we all wanted to try something new.

Christina: Speak for yourself. The “something new” for me was writing a story with first-person point-of-view. The BDSM was same-old, same-old for me.

Emily: That’s our whips-and-chains girl!

Ginny: I liked the contrast of our four stories. We have distinct voices, but I could tell our stories would mesh well.

Maggie: You mean, they could be tied together easily.

Emily: With Ginny, everything’s easy!

Ginny: Hey! I mean, hey, Chris, tell me more about this same-old, same-old…

Maggie: Heh. Tied together.

Christina: Well, it all starts with a safe word. Let’s say yours is “alphabet”…

Emily: Focus, ladies!

Ginny: Oh, fine, spoil our fun. I’m thinking back to our first Skype session. Or, as I like to think of it, the one where Christina bothered to show up. She seems often “tied up” with other things. ;)

Christina: I’m never going to live that down, am I?

Emily: Oh, I don’t know. If you showed up on time, we might forget your previous lapses.

Christina: Moving on. Yes, I remember that discussion too. When we realized that we’d all written BDSM, we thought we should branch out, try new themes.

Maggie: As I recall it, Chris, you were the most nervous about that idea.

Christina: I’d had so much fun writing about Rachel going to “bondage school” and having a crush on her French instructor, Marc. Who’d want to give that up? But I came around.

Emily: I enjoyed exploring the BDSM dynamic between two women. I thought about how weird and intriguing it must be for a young woman to work as the receptionist at a BDSM club and have a crush on a gorgeous Domme.

Maggie: So what inspired you, Ginny?

Ginny: I thought about how a little bit of kink could get together two people who might otherwise never have hooked up. I liked the idea of cops being undercover, but I wanted Lane to be something other than a police officer. Cameron’s got a couple issues, so I liked their layered dynamic. In real life, he has to submit to her as the department shrink, but undercover she has to do what he says. And in the bedroom…

Christina: Yes, that’s true of all our stories: In the bedroom…

Emily: Or, in my case, in the dungeon…

Maggie: In the sex shop…

Ginny: So that’s what brought us together. Our love of the ellipses (sorry to Deb, our editor, we’re working on it.) Those three little dots that suggest sexy times wherever the characters might find themselves. We hope that you enjoy the spicy new twist on the alphabet that we’ll be bringing you this year, and that you love reading what comes after the ellipses as much as we loved writing it!
Love Letters Volume 1: Obeying Desire by Ginny Glass, Christina Thacher, Emily Cale and Maggie Wells

available NOW at the Carina Press bookstore or your favorite ebook retailer!

Hang out with the Love Letters ladies on Twitter!

@GinnyGlass

@ChristnaThacher

@EmilyCale

@MaggieWells1

Overreaching Can Be Good For You

facebook twitter

I’m guessing everyone out there is guilty of bluffing their way through at least one thing in life. Maybe joined in a game of pool without knowing which end of the cue to use, just because there was a hot guy at the table? (Guilty!) Or accepted a new job that had computer program requirements you’d never even heard of (hey, that’s what manuals are for, right?).

Well, here’s my behind-the-scenes confession of one time I overreached as a writer. When my editor, Angela James, put out a call for contemporary trilogies, I got excited. I had a finished book that—in theory—was the start of a trilogy. I say in theory, because I’d never written a sequel, let alone three connected books. Sure, when I wrote that first one, I planned enough secondary characters to sprinkle throughout a trilogy. But all I had was a vague plan. And, when I submitted my manuscript to her, this single, additional sentence: I plan for book two, A FINE ROMANCE, to focus on a sexy male chocolatier fighting his attraction to a romance store manager who hates chocolate.

She bought the trilogy, sending me into about 5 minutes of sheer happiness, followed by seven straight days of sheer panic. Did I have what it takes to write a trilogy? Could I figure out how much of book one’s storyline had to be woven in to book two? Could I figure out how to stretch a dislike of chocolate into 98,000 words? Yup, I overreached. But it was good for me—and worked out far better than my attempt to flirt my way through a game of pool. Sometimes, we need to be pushed out beyond our comfort zone. Now it’s your turn – share your examples of overreaching—and how it worked out!

Here’s a peek at the end result of my overreach—A Fine Romance:

They say you form your first impression of someone within thirty seconds of meeting them. Or, in Mira Parrish’s case, within thirty minutes of not meeting them, when said person is supposed to pick you up from the airport and never shows. This is not a perfect start to her new life. Her friend Ivy is depending on her to run a new romance store, and Mira can’t afford to let her down.

Sam Lyons should probably apologize. But every time he sees Mira—which is often, since his family owns the bakery next to her shop—he can’t resist antagonizing her. There’s something about the sexy, straitlaced woman that drives him crazy. He can’t get involved, though. He has too much baggage to be any good in a serious relationship.

Despite his teasing attitude, Mira finds Sam too sweet to resist. (His hot body may be a factor.) But if there’s going to be anything permanent between them, they’ll need to let go of their pasts and look to the future…

 

 

Purchase at  Carina Press

Website | Blog | Pinterest | Twitter | Goodreads | Amazon Author Page |

The Allure of Mr. Darcy

facebook twitter

Why is it that after almost 200 years, we still swoon over Mr. Darcy? If you’ve known me long enough, you’d know how much I dislike the overly romantic movies and books and such. I have no romantic gooey centre to speak of, unless it comes to the likes of Mr. Darcy. Then I swoon with the best of them.

Why? I have asked myself a million times. I think there are a few reasons.

1. He’s not what he seems. When we first meet him, he seems arrogant, and pompous and rude. But then learn that he’s actually shy and awkward in crowds and can’t express himself well. Sigh.
2. He’s the guy you want to have around when the crap hits the fan. He’s the guy that will go and do what needs to be done, without telling anyone. And no one had to tell him. He just does it. He’s the man that will fix the dishwasher when it breaks, the moment it breaks. Or he’ll go buy a new one without you having to nag at him.
3. He’s looking for an equal. He wants a woman that can meet him head on, and not back down. Not some simpering girl who’s looking for a rich man to save her and take care of her.
4. When he does express himself, it’s full of awkward honesty. What woman doesn’t want a man to stumble and falter over his declaration of love for her? That he’s so overwhelmed by his feelings he has a difficult time expressing himself. Love.
5. And of course he’s a man of means. What woman doesn’t want a man who can provide for her without thought, without question, whether she wants it or not, whether she needs it or not?

These reasons and more, is why I created Rhys Davenport. He most definitely fits into this mold. People often think him cold and unflinching, even his own brothers. But deep inside a fiery passion simmers waiting for the right woman to unlock and unleash. All he’s ever wanted is a woman who is his equal in all things.

And he finds it in Corina Stratton, a village physic, with lofty aspirations of her own.

Are you a Mr. Darcy fan? Why or why not?

The Most Fun Research Ever

facebook twitter

When my editor, the fabulous and insightful Deb Nemeth, emailed to tell me the good news that Carina was excited to be publishing Platinum, she also mentioned a few “little fixes.” Most were very easy, but one sent me for a whirl.

I’d set the story in Charleston, S.C., a lovely, historic city by sea, and she wanted more ambience. More details, more specifics of how it feels to be there.

Now, Deb is always right. (She claims that she isn’t, but she is.) And I knew what was bothering her. I’d been to Charleston, but it was years and years ago. My memories had gone stale. When I mentioned this to my friends, they all said “Great excuse for weekend trip to Charleston!”

Yeah, right.

I live in Santa Fe, New Mexico, which is *not* close to South Carolina. So, instead, I did what I do best – I fretted. I looked up stuff online. I played with maps and photos, but none of it felt write. I tried to revise, but I just couldn’t FEEL it.  So I fretted some more.

Finally, my husband got tired of listening to the fretting and said, “Why don’t you just go already?”

I gave him my same lines about time and money and he just shook his head at me and said, “You have to do what you have to do.”

So I went.

I managed to tack a weekend by myself in Charleston onto a day job trip – and it was amazing. Everything fell into place.

An art gallery owner referred me to a friend who lives above her gallery – and that became Althea’s apartment. I found her neighborhood and a shop that could be her neighbor.

 

 

 
The side paths and courtyards, the stately old mansions by the sea all reminded me.

 

 


 

 

 

 

I saw the window boxes of flowers.

 

 


Had dinner where Althea and Abby meet up, under the old magnolia tree.

 

 

 

 

 

 
And found the house that could belong to Brandon’s mother out on Sullivan’s Island.

All in all, it was money and time well spent. I hope I managed to work in just a bit of how this city looks, sounds, tastes, smells and feels. Althea and Steel’s story is very much about the landscape and the different faces of the culture that shaped them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Platinum
Althea Grant is doing fine. Sure, her Charleston gallery is suffering from the bad economy, and her artistic aspirations have gone nowhere. But she’s happy enough. When rugged metal sculptor Steel rides up on his motorcycle looking to rent studio space, his infusion of cash is more than welcome. But his art is raw, visceral, sexual-and completely inappropriate for her pastel world of watercolor landscapes. Steel, fascinated by Althea’s rare albino coloring, sees in her the key to his next piece: a metal satyr that can be used for bondage games. Moving into her gallery basement is the first step; seducing the coolly polite lady into modeling for him is the second. As Steel peels away her careful manners and tasteful outfits, Althea begins to realize her life isn’t just fine at all-it’s as pale and washed-out as the watercolor paintings she’s failing to sell. Can she transform her life and accept her most secret desires?

You can buy Platinum on the Carina Press Website, on Amazon (including an Audible version!) and on Barnes & Noble.

About Jeffe
Jeffe Kennedy took the crooked road to writing, stopping off at neurobiology, religious studies and environmental consulting before her creative writing began appearing in places like Redbook, Puerto del Sol, Wyoming Wildlife, Under the Sun and Aeon. A BDSM novella, Petals and Thorns, came out in 2010, heralding yet another branch of her path, into erotica and romantic fantasy fiction. Since then, erotic shorts in the Blood Currency series—Feeding the Vampire and Hunting the Siren—have come out from Ellora’s Cave. Carina Press is publishing the Facet of Desire series, which includes Sapphire, Platinum and soon, Ruby. Her fantasy romance novel, Rogue’s Pawn, book one in A Covenant of Thorns, came out in July, 2012, and will soon be followed by two more. An e-serial—an erotic modernization of The Phantom of the Opera—will release from Kensington Press soon, followed by a new three-book adult fantasy series.

Jeffe lives in Santa Fe, with two Maine coon cats, a border collie, plentiful free-range lizards and frequently serves as a guinea pig for a professional acupuncturist.
Find her on Facebook and Twitter (@jeffekennedy) or visit her at her website.

Becoming Little

facebook twitter

I am of slightly above-average height, but I have written a book about a little person, or a dwarf.

In order to get into character, I had to do a lot of mental adjustment. My heroine, Gretchen, is barely four feet tall. She lives in post-medieval Europe, somewhere around the Schwarzwald, or the Black Forest. She has the most common form of dwarfism, achondroplasia. It is the form you are probably most familiar with.

In order to get to know my character–to try her out, to see if she would work–I wrote a little scene about the kind of treatment she has to put up with:

 

“We have a dwarf here in town.” Gretchen looked around to see who had spoken. It was Gisela, of course.

The minstrel turned toward her. “Yes, so I’ve heard.”

Gretchen sighed. She may as well get it over before Gisela said something nasty. Gretchen stood and clambered onto her chair, and then onto the table. “Over here,” she said, waving her handkerchief.

His eyes snapped her way. “Fräulein,” he said. “Maybe we’ll share a beer together after my performance.”

Gretchen didn’t want to, but she nodded anyway. She would listen to whatever demeaning thing the minstrel had to say in order to hear more about the dwarf asylum.

“Why not meet her now?” Gisela yelled. “Bring her forward!”

“No!” Gretchen yelled, but it was too late. A big man named Karl, who had been sitting with Gisela, jumped up and grabbed her before she had a chance to climb back into her chair. Two other men joined in, although it wasn’t really necessary. A hand clamped around her breast, and fury surged into her heart and stung tears in her eyes. Gretchen began to slap with abandon.

“Stop it! Put me down!” She clouted an ear.

“Ow!” One man yelled.

Emboldened, she began to kick. She heard an “Oof!”

“Gently!” the Spielmann said. “She is a lady, after all.”

This elicited a chuckle all around.

Karl plunked her down in front of the minstrel with too much force. Gretchen’s knees buckled, but the minstrel’s hand shot out to steady her. She glared at him and swiped a tear off her cheek.

 

When this scene practically wrote itself, I knew I had to keep writing. The Magic Mirror and the Seventh Dwarf is a retelling of the Snow White story from Gretchen’s viewpoint. She hears about a farm owned by dwarfs and that that employs only dwarfs, so she travels there in search of love–or at the very least, a husband she can tolerate. She does not expect to actually find love, since she doesn’t exactly lead a charmed life.

Once there, she finds a lot of things she doesn’t expect.

She doesn’t expect to become a very sought-after young lady. She doesn’t expect two men to fight over her. She doesn’t expect a kind and mentoring relationship with the farm wife. She never expects to be swept up in a magical adventure with a runaway princess and a cursed prince.

And the last thing she expects is to have to become a hero, especially at the side of the man she loves.

~*~

Tia Nevitt is an award-winning author who writes fantasy and science fiction with a dash of romance. You can find her online at www.tianevitt.com, @tianevitt and www.facebook.com/tia.nevitt.

Carina PressAmazonBarnes and NobleGoogle PlayOmni Lit

Overheard at @HarlequinBooks/@CarinaPress

facebook twitter

by Amy Wilkins, Assistant Manager of Digital Content & Social Media

If you follow me on Twitter (and if you don’t, I’m @amywilkins — at least until my wedding in 3 months) you will have seen my somewhat sneaky habit of tweeting “Overheard at @HarlequinBooks”. Like several others who work here (like Patty!), I love to share some of the funny and strange things we say around Romance HQ — anonymously, of course. There’s probably not that many offices that have such fun and bizarre conversations — all business-related — or hilarious out-of-context snippets of dialogue.

One of the most common sources of my Overheard at @HarlequinBooks tweets are Carina Press meetings. Talking about things like BDSM, menages, rejected bits of cover copy, etc. that may be NSFW (Not Safe for Work) at most places provides lots of good fodder. Plus I just happen to work with incredibly witty people. :)

So for fun today, I’ve gathered some of my Overheard tweets. Can you guess which ones came from a Carina meeting? (Hint: 4 were said by members of the Carina team, who will remain anonymous!)

“I’m actually reading a hard copy and it’s really annoying.”

“Oregon has a coast?”

“It was the lesser of two penises.”

“Yes, ‘huntsman’ sounds male because ‘man’ is in it. I’m on fire today.”

“It’s very accessible BDSM — I never thought I’d say that.”

“She’s lying in a pool of goat’s blood.”

“I know this will sound like an ‘Overheard at Harlequin’, but are we still doing that menage thing?”

“Haven’t you ever heard of the magic peen?”

And my most retweeted Overheard tweet: “This is a picture of my underpants.”

 

 

Acquisition meetings: Carina Press style

facebook twitter

I do love meetings at Harlequin HQ. I usually end up off my chair laughing or at the very least learning new romance concepts (How do you spell monogamous ménage again?). So when the opportunity to join the Carina Press Acquisitions Team came up, I jumped at the chance. Not only does the team have a reputation of giving good meeting, the “overheard” tweets from them are always pure gold.

Por ejemplo:

#Overheard at Harlequin It’s not your typical dom/sub relationship. @carinapress

— Malle Vallik (@MalleVallik) January 10, 2013

“It’s a lightsuspense w/paranormal elephants. I mean elements”. <-overheard in acq meeting. Paranormal elephants wld have been awesome!

— Angela James (@angelajames) June 19, 2012

Overheard at @harlequinbooks HQ: “Back to erotic Christmas.” (in a @carinapress meeting of course!)

— Harlequin Books (@HarlequinBooks) July 20, 2012

(To get a glimpse of “overheard” tweets all around the romance mothership in real time, follow @carinapress and @harlequinbooks on Twitter. And if you’re so inclined, follow me at @pattyanasco too!)

Fun times aside, acquisition meetings are usually filled with discovery. Every week, I learn more and more about the different books we publish and watch how the rest of the Acquisitions Team respond passionately (for good or bad) to their assigned reads. My personal preference is contemporary or erotic romance so hearing Jenny talk about Eleri Stone or Malle discuss New Adult teaches me a bit more about genres I should start reading!

Another thing I particularly enjoy about Acquisitions is that we are free to talk about books we love using terminology not used anywhere else in Corporate America/Canada. Just yesterday, while giving feedback on an erotic romance submission, I mentioned that it was “accessible BDSM, which I never thought I’d say”. There were nods around the room (after, of course, a bit of laughter) but they got it.

So to my Carina Press family, thank you for welcoming me into the fold so warmly. I’m having such a great time being a part of the team and am looking forward to more reads. Maybe sometime soon I’ll get the chance to use “more naked cowboys” in my feedback, yes?

*****

Patty Anasco is Assistant Manager, Site Operations for Harlequin.com when she isn’t busy reading submissions or losing to her mom on Words With Friends.

That Time I Unexpectedly Got Engaged

facebook twitter

by Tara Stevens, Carina Press acquisition team member

Once upon a time there was a shy, redheaded girl who worked at a romance novel company. She was in charge of the eNewsletter program. On her first day of work, she met a dishy Italian fella who would copyedit her newsletters and change her life. Yes, he diligently pointed out all her missing commas and awkward phrasing, but he also lent her his book on Woody Allen films and asked her to go for a walk at lunchtime. Sometimes she would sneak secret looks at him when he walked to the printer or they had a meeting together.

Eventually, through a gift of kismet, they found themselves sitting across from each other in an open-plan office and falling in love. They tried to keep their romance private, but her blushing cheeks often gave them away when they were caught standing a little too close together at a social event. One sad day he left the company to work at an awful banking job and she missed her lunch partner and best friend. One happy day they moved in together with a plant called Bernard. Twenty months later he made her a delicious brunch for her 30-something birthday. Then he slid off the couch, popped onto one knee and asked her to marry him. She asked if it was a joke four times, then said yes.

***

Confession time: an unexpected engagement will not only tilt your world in a wonderful-yet-scary way, it will also steal all your blog post topics. It’s been three weeks since I got my surprise sparkler, but I find my mind has been taken over by all things betrothal.

With all this excitement in my personal life, my what-to-read-next thoughts are naturally turning towards books featuring engagements and weddings. I want to read about other women experiencing this magical, special time and bask in the glow just a little bit longer, before all the wedding planning reality sets in.

I’ve begun compiling a list of wedding-focused reading material to devour once the holidays arrive and I have time to lose myself in books. Of course, I started with any Carina Press titles that fall into this category that I haven’t read yet! The first one that popped into my mind was Ask Her at Christmas, by Christi Barth, along with the first book in her popular Aisle Bound series, Planning for Love. Fatal Destiny by Marie Force is another must-read on my list, since I adore her Fatal series.

I know there must be loads of other titles out there that fit this theme, and I’m greedy for more! Which romance novel with an engagement or wedding as a major plot point is your favorite?

 

Playing with alpha males

facebook twitter

Characters introduce themselves to me in different ways. I’ll get a flash of the first scene, of how they’re woven into their world and then I get to build it around them. One character could be sitting in a chair before a fire, smoking an expensive cigar, calm, collected and knowing he’s waiting to spring a trap.  Another could be strapped to a table, with an alien truth device worming its way into her neck.  Or another illegally wearing someone else’s body in a cyber generated world. I expect the flashes. What I didn’t expect was what the hero of Dark Dealings does every morning. And more than that, the fact that he enjoys it. Far too much.

Captain Heyerdar is a fire  and earth elemental. His magic comes from those two sources. My first glimpse of him was the same as my heroine’s, the same as practically everyone in the palace. He’s naked, performing a slow and rhythmic rite to the sun, gilded in light..and simply beautiful. He’s also very aware that in the shadows people watch and want him. Have I mentioned Heyerdar’s confidence and ego? He’s alpha male to the core.

Ava watches him every morning, as she has breakfast with her mentor. His power draws her…but she finds, like her, he loves someone who doesn’t return that love. The glimpses she catches of his pain drives her forward to offer the deal that will change everything.

Thinking on it, the first alpha hero I fell for goes all the way back to Edward Rochester, him of the broken and broody… *grin* I stayed up all night wanting Jane’s happy ending with her dark hero. I read it again the next night to get that HEA hit again!

So can you remember the first brooding alpha male you fell hard for?

Dark Dealings cover

Ava Kalle’s empty soul devours magic. And her hunger is deadly. She’s sharp, quick and can live in shadow, making her work as a spy for the Mages a natural choice. She lives on the fringes of society and likes it that way.

When the man she loves takes another woman for his mate, the darkness in her heart unravels and she’ll do anything to get him back. She makes a dangerous deal with a fire elemental, Heyerdar, who has a vested interest in agreeing: together they’ll use forbidden magic, harnessing their sexual energy to drive the couple apart.

But soon their pact pushes them both into a dark sexual obsession. One that Ava may not be able to control…

Carina Press || Amazon US || Amazon UK

Amazon de || Barnes and Noble || ARe

Kim Knox brews sex, magic, darkness and technology in a little corner of North West England. She writes erotic science fiction and fantasy romance for Cleis Press, Carina Press and Ellora’s Cave.